The Tablecloth

Dyed the hues of harvest
the rich cloth caught my hand
while we shopped the Rue de Cler.

Plum wine and violet,
oranges, burnt to umber,
for years we shared a feast of gifts.

Ripened yellow lemons
and green of lime and grass,
raw but truthful words.

Companions with bread
we would sit at the table
graced with this reminder –
once friends in Paris.

The Glass Wall

Here’s the weird thing about death: There’s a
sensation that you’ll see her again. You know
she’s gone, but you’ll recognize her voice next
time she calls. It’s like she’s just moved away.
She could move back – or come for a visit to see
your new kitchen. You miss her and think: I’m
going to call. Then recall. Time passes without
a word. Doesn’t stop you from wondering what
to get her for Christmas. Remember? There’s a
stab of guilt, too, because you can’t think what
to get her this year, and you feel relief. But other
times – years later – you see a scarf that she’d like.
You see her in a flash, an image incomplete. You
glimpse her through a storefront window where
she’s behind you, reflected in the glass.